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100 Best Castle Photographs

Leeds Castle, Kent, England... http://www.castlesandmanorhouses.com/photos.htm .... A castle has been on the site since 1119. In the 13th century it came into the hands of King Edward I, for whom it became a favourite residence; in the 16th century, Henry VIII used it as a residence for his first wife, Catherine of Aragon. The castle was a location for the 1949 film Kind Hearts and Coronets where it stood in for "Chalfont", the ancestral home of the d'Ascoyne family.

Leeds Castle is in Kent, England, 5 miles southeast of Maidstone. A castle has been on the site since 1119. In the 13th century it came into the hands of King Edward I, in the 16th century, Henry VIII used it as a residence for his first wife, Catherine of Aragon.

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Black Swan at Leeds Castle, Kent. England. Leeds really is one of the most beautiful castles. Built in 1119 it came into the hands of King Edward I for whom it became a favourite residence, in the 16th century Henry VIII used it as a residence for his first wife, Catherine of Aragon.

16th century Avebury Manor and Gardens by flash of light. Wiltshire, England

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Chateau de Joux

Château de Joux, France

William the Conqueror used enforced Anglo-Saxon labor for work on the construction of Leeds Castle. The original wooden castle was replaced by a fortified stone castle in 1119. An important feature of Leeds Castle is its access to the River Len. Leeds Castle occupies three islands surrounded by an artificial lake. King Henry VIII converted Leeds Castle into a Royal Palace but retained the defences due to the possible risk of invasion from Spain or France.

Leeds Castle - Kent, England; built on islands in a lake formed by the River Len to the east of the village of Leeds; dates back to 1119; in 1278 the castle came into the hands of King Edward I, for whom it became a favorite residence; it has been rebuilt over the years, so the castle seen today dates mostly from the 19th century

Chester Cathedral dates from between 1093 and the early 16th century, and had many alterations in the intervening period. The site had been used for Christian worship since Roman times. There was a Saxon abbey here from the mid-10th century, but this was razed to the ground in around 1090. In 1093 a Benedictine monastery was established here, and in 1541 this became a cathedral of the Church of England, following the dissolution of the monastries by King Henry VIII.