Explorez Oiran Et Tayuu, Maiko Oiran et plus encore !

A woman dressed as a tayuu

A woman dressed as a tayuu

A Hangyoku (Young Geisha) holding a Kumade or "Lucky Charm Rake", which are sometimes styled to resemble cypress-slat fans, as here. The Otafuku mask or “Goddess of Mirth” is generally attached to help rake in happiness and prosperity. Kumade are sold at Tori-no-Ichi Festivals that are held in November, throughout Japan. The largest of the Tori-no-Ichi Festivals are in Tokyo.

A Hangyoku (Young Geisha) holding a Kumade or "Lucky Charm Rake", which are sometimes styled to resemble cypress-slat fans, as here. The Otafuku mask or “Goddess of Mirth” is generally attached to help rake in happiness and prosperity. Kumade are sold at Tori-no-Ichi Festivals that are held in November, throughout Japan. The largest of the Tori-no-Ichi Festivals are in Tokyo.

Oiran-dochu - Asakusa, Tokyo

Oiran-dochu - Asakusa, Tokyo

kyoto

kyoto

Oiran with falling hair and kanoko

Oiran with falling hair and kanoko

Maiko, 1920s

Maiko, 1920s

Oiran's hairstyle

Oiran's hairstyle

Maiko Hatsuko and Maiko Hiroko 1920s by Blue Ruin1, via Flickr - Explore the World with Travel Nerd Nici, one Country at a Time. http://TravelNerdNici.com

Maiko Hatsuko and Maiko Hiroko 1920s by Blue Ruin1, via Flickr - Explore the World with Travel Nerd Nici, one Country at a Time. http://TravelNerdNici.com

japanska

japanska

Geisha

Geisha

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