juggling-life.jpg 350×350 пикс

juggling-life.jpg 350×350 пикс

Les expressions utilisant des animaux en anglais . www.anglais-in-france.fr

Les expressions utilisant des animaux en anglais . www.anglais-in-france.fr

Expr-Avoir_Carte-Blanche_800pt.jpg (800×600)

Expr-Avoir_Carte-Blanche_800pt.jpg (800×600)

Idiom Land on

Idiom Land on

Cpe,Apprendre L'anglais,Idiomes Anglais,Vocabulaire Anglais,Langue Anglaise,Grammaire,Paroles,Langues,English Time

Collective nouns for animal groups

Collective nouns for animal groups

Idioms humor cash cow

Idioms humor cash cow

Pushing the Envelope

Pushing the Envelope

Head Over Heels - In the fourteenth century, it was written as “heels over head”, which makes a lot more sense. Logically, it meant to be upside down, or, as to turn heels over head. Otherwise, we spend most of our waking moments “head over heels”. Today, it means to be madly in love.

Head Over Heels - In the fourteenth century, it was written as “heels over head”, which makes a lot more sense. Logically, it meant to be upside down, or, as to turn heels over head. Otherwise, we spend most of our waking moments “head over heels”. Today, it means to be madly in love.

I've noticed I have some of these lol only are my friend when no one else is around. As soon as other people show up, they don't know me. Lame.

I've noticed I have some of these lol only are my friend when no one else is around. As soon as other people show up, they don't know me. Lame.

On the Ball - The original saying was “put something on the ball”, in that unusual speed or a deceptive motion was used by the pitcher when throwing the baseball. From 1909: “Cates had something on the ball. The two innings he worked he had the Pirates buffaloed.” An earlier expression was to “Always keep your eye on the ball” from the mid 1800’s. By the 1930s, it was used to mean somebody who was especially alert or capable at what they are doing.

On the Ball - The original saying was “put something on the ball”, in that unusual speed or a deceptive motion was used by the pitcher when throwing the baseball. From 1909: “Cates had something on the ball. The two innings he worked he had the Pirates buffaloed.” An earlier expression was to “Always keep your eye on the ball” from the mid 1800’s. By the 1930s, it was used to mean somebody who was especially alert or capable at what they are doing.

Pinterest
Rechercher