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Daily Paleo Art Month #10: Henodus  Much like the not-a-rabbit from a couple of days ago, this creature wasn’t a turtle. It was actually a member of a Triassic marine reptile group known as placodonts, which were closer related to plesiosaurs than anything resembling a chelonian. Henodus here came from the Late Triassic of Germany, around 225 million years ago, and reached lengths of about 1m (3.3ft).  Henodus is the only placodont found in non-marine deposits, living in brackish lagoons or…

Daily Paleo Art Month #10: Henodus Much like the not-a-rabbit from a couple of days ago, this creature wasn’t a turtle. It was actually a member of a Triassic marine reptile group known as placodonts, which were closer related to plesiosaurs than anything resembling a chelonian. Henodus here came from the Late Triassic of Germany, around 225 million years ago, and reached lengths of about 1m (3.3ft). Henodus is the only placodont found in non-marine deposits, living in brackish lagoons or…

Daily Paleo Art Month #4: Drepanosaurus  These arboreal reptiles came from the Late Triassic of northern Italy, about 218 million years ago. Drepanosaurus unguicaudatus is known from just one specimen, missing the head and neck, and at around 50cm long (20in) it was the largest of the drepanosaurs.  Now, where to even start with the oddities of these creatures’ anatomy? Drepanosaurs had a long lizard-like body, a bony hump over their shoulders, grasping limbs like a chameleon, long necks…

Daily Paleo Art Month #4: Drepanosaurus These arboreal reptiles came from the Late Triassic of northern Italy, about 218 million years ago. Drepanosaurus unguicaudatus is known from just one specimen, missing the head and neck, and at around 50cm long (20in) it was the largest of the drepanosaurs. Now, where to even start with the oddities of these creatures’ anatomy? Drepanosaurs had a long lizard-like body, a bony hump over their shoulders, grasping limbs like a chameleon, long necks…

Machairoceratops by Pierre Huot

Machairoceratops by Pierre Huot

Marine Reptile Month #4 – Tanystropheus  Middle Triassic period (245–228 mya)  The Triassic was sort of weird. In the wake of the most devastating extinction event in Earth’s history, life re-diversified in a great “Triassic explosion” of new body plans and evolutionary experiments. Many recognizable groups arose in this time – including plesiosaurs, ichthyosaurs, pterosaurs, dinosaurs, crocodyllians, frogs, modern types of corals, and the first true mammals – but there were also a whole…

Marine Reptile Month #4 – Tanystropheus Middle Triassic period (245–228 mya) The Triassic was sort of weird. In the wake of the most devastating extinction event in Earth’s history, life re-diversified in a great “Triassic explosion” of new body plans and evolutionary experiments. Many recognizable groups arose in this time – including plesiosaurs, ichthyosaurs, pterosaurs, dinosaurs, crocodyllians, frogs, modern types of corals, and the first true mammals – but there were also a whole…

Henodus //DAMNFX © 2005 National Geographic

Henodus //DAMNFX © 2005 National Geographic

A cousin of modern crocodiles, Postosuchus was an archosaur - the lineage of reptiles that include the crocodiles, dinosaurs and birds. Reaching lengths of five metres, Postosuchus was the top predator during the Late Triassic in what’s now the southern USA. Since its front limbs were shorter than its hind limbs, there is debate as to whether it walked on two legs or four, but most palaeontologists favour the latter. Its stance, with the legs under the body, would have made it a faster and…

A cousin of modern crocodiles, Postosuchus was an archosaur - the lineage of reptiles that include the crocodiles, dinosaurs and birds. Reaching lengths of five metres, Postosuchus was the top predator during the Late Triassic in what’s now the southern USA. Since its front limbs were shorter than its hind limbs, there is debate as to whether it walked on two legs or four, but most palaeontologists favour the latter. Its stance, with the legs under the body, would have made it a faster and…

Illustration de Placochelys. © Dinosaures et autres animaux de la préhistoire Könemann

Illustration de Placochelys. © Dinosaures et autres animaux de la préhistoire Könemann

Evolution Liked · 15 minutes ago Fossilization is a rare process and paleontologists are used to having to build an image of an animal from incomplete remains. So when paleontologists unearthed a mass grave of Diprotodon skeletons and other Australian megafauna, they couldn't believe their luck. "It's a palaeontologist's goldmine where we can really see what these megafauna were doing, how they actually behaved

Evolution Liked · 15 minutes ago Fossilization is a rare process and paleontologists are used to having to build an image of an animal from incomplete remains. So when paleontologists unearthed a mass grave of Diprotodon skeletons and other Australian megafauna, they couldn't believe their luck. "It's a palaeontologist's goldmine where we can really see what these megafauna were doing, how they actually behaved

Deux têtes de lions, peintures préhistoriques, Grotte Chauvet.

Deux têtes de lions, peintures préhistoriques, Grotte Chauvet.

Whalevolution Month #04 – Ambulocetus The “walking whale” Ambulocetus is known from Pakistan about 50-48 million years ago. Around 3m long (10′10″), it was a more amphibious creature than the pakicetids, with its hind limbs better adapted for swimming. While its eyes were high on its skull like Pakicetus, they faced more to the sides than upwards.

Whalevolution Month #04 – Ambulocetus The “walking whale” Ambulocetus is known from Pakistan about 50-48 million years ago. Around 3m long (10′10″), it was a more amphibious creature than the pakicetids, with its hind limbs better adapted for swimming. While its eyes were high on its skull like Pakicetus, they faced more to the sides than upwards.

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