Pinterest • Le catalogue d'idées

A British SAS team, returning from a three-month desert patrol during the North African campaign (January 18, 1943). The Jeeps were stripped of all unnecessary parts to save weight for fuel, provisions, and machine guns.

à partir de WW2DB

[Photo] A close-up of a British heavily armed patrol of L Detachment SAS in their jeeps, just back from a three month patrol, 18 Jan 1943; note twin-mounted Vickers K machine guns and F-S dagger; photo 2 of 3

The men who did it all: A close-up of a British heavily armed patrol of L Detachment SAS in their jeeps, just back from a three month patrol, 18 Jan 1943; note twin-mounted Vickers K machine guns.

à partir de Picto

Robert Capa: La vérité en face

Robert Capa (1913-1954) Hungarian war photographer and photojournalist of 5 wars: Spanish Civil War, 2nd Sino-Japanese War, World War II across Europe, 1948 Arab-Israeli War, and 1st Indochina War. In 1947, he co-founded Magnum Photos with Henri Cartier-Bresson and others, the first and only, cooperative agency for worldwide freelance photographers. He died after stepping on a landmine in Vietnam while covering a French advance

This image shows an American soldier risking his life to save two Vietnamese children during a fight. This is bravery. A man risking his life to save the enemy's children #OneBraveThing

Thomas Bird wanted to fly so badly that he constructed a flying machine from an old outboard motor and discarded ceiling fan. Unfortunately, he was only aloft for 7 minutes before colliding with a flock of seagull...

Sgt Jake McNiece, Ponca City, Oklahoma, of the 101st Airborne Division, getting ready to drop into Normandy, June 1944. Jake was a member of the Choctaw nation, hence the “Mohawk” style haircut. Jake was a member of "The Filthy Thirteen" which was the name given to the 1st Demolition Section of the Regimental Headquarters Company of the 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division, of the United States Army, which fought in the European campaign in World War II.