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Wise words of the former world-famous professional boxer Muhammad Ali. In an era defined by endless war—when he was drafted and was told that he must fight the communists—his reply was, “No Vietnamese ever called me a nigger”. Consequently, Ali was stripped of his title, expelled from boxing and sentenced to five years in prison.

Along with World War I, World War II was one of the great watersheds of…

Artist, architect, and environmentalist Maya Lin "has maintained a balance between art and architecture throughout her career, creating a remarkable body of work that includes large-scale site-specific installations, intimate studio artworks, architectural works and memorials. A committed environmentalist, Lin has consistently focused on environmental concerns, promoting sustainable building design in her architectural works," her biography on http://www.mayalin.com/ reads.

Henri Cartier-Bresson, unknown on ArtStack #henri-cartier-bresson #art

The Vietnam War was a controversial war that needed the support of the people in the United States. In order to get this support, the government and other individuals would create propaganda. One of the most prevalent methods of gaining support was through art. Different types of artists would create a piece of artwork that represents a point of view on the war.

Horst Faas, War is Hell on ArtStack #horst-faas #art

Maya Ying Lin (born October 5, 1959) is an American designer and artist who is known for her work in sculpture and landscape art. She first came to fame at the age of 21 as the designer of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C Her vision and focus is always on how space needs to be in the future and what it means to people. She has tried to focus less on how politics influence design, but more on what emotions the space would create and what it would symbolize to the user.

à partir de Speckyboy Design Magazine

30 Political Propaganda Posters from Modern History

This antiwar poster is a contemporary example of classic war propaganda, artwork that is used to elicit strong emotions and call viewers to action. This poster lists the number of Americans and Vietnamese killed during the Vietnam war and uses these statistics to encourage voters to, “bring all the troops home now”. The poster was commissioned by the pollitical activist group "citizens for immediate withdrawl".