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Vatican

Vatican

Bronze gilded statuette of seated Heru Pa Khart (Harpocrates), boy deity with the sidelock of youth. The face bears traces of past gilding, the whole statue was gilded. 1069-664BC. 22nd-26th dynasty. Egypt. Louvre museum, Paris.

Bronze gilded statuette of seated Heru Pa Khart (Harpocrates), boy deity with the sidelock of youth. The face bears traces of past gilding, the whole statue was gilded. 1069-664BC. 22nd-26th dynasty. Egypt. Louvre museum, Paris.

Mosaic Floor in the Round Room, Pio-Clementino Museum, Vatican City

Mosaic Floor in the Round Room, Pio-Clementino Museum, Vatican City

The Ankh was an ancient Egyptian symbol of eternal life and immortality. The word ankh also means "mirror" in the ancient Egyptian language, as in a mirror to the soul. At the top of the ankh shown, there wings of Isis and a solar disk w/cobras. 2 Cobras, representing the goddess of Lower Egypt, are across the bar. At the bottom, King Ankhnaton.

The Ankh was an ancient Egyptian symbol of eternal life and immortality. The word ankh also means "mirror" in the ancient Egyptian language, as in a mirror to the soul. At the top of the ankh shown, there wings of Isis and a solar disk w/cobras. 2 Cobras, representing the goddess of Lower Egypt, are across the bar. At the bottom, King Ankhnaton.

Roman bronze statuette of a dog, 2nd–3rd century CE. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

Roman bronze statuette of a dog, 2nd–3rd century CE. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

Villa of the Mysteries, back left corner | Flickr - Photo Sharing!

Villa of the Mysteries, back left corner | Flickr - Photo Sharing!

Glass cup. Period: Imperial. Date: mid-1st–early 2nd century A.D. Culture: Roman.

Glass cup. Period: Imperial. Date: mid-1st–early 2nd century A.D. Culture: Roman.

Roman Emperor Hadrian....genius, artist, soldier....

Roman Emperor Hadrian....genius, artist, soldier....

Cantharus (drinking cup), ca. 40–80 A.D.; Early Imperial, Claudian or Flavian  Roman  Glass; free-blown

Cantharus (drinking cup), ca. 40–80 A.D.; Early Imperial, Claudian or Flavian Roman Glass; free-blown

Portrait head of the Roman Emperor Constantine I - In 330 A.D., the first Christian ruler of the Roman empire, Constantine the Great (r. 306–337), transferred the ancient imperial capital from Rome to the city of 'Byzantion' located on the easternmost territory of the European continent, at a major intersection of east-west trade. The emperor renamed this ancient port city Constantinople.

Portrait head of the Roman Emperor Constantine I - In 330 A.D., the first Christian ruler of the Roman empire, Constantine the Great (r. 306–337), transferred the ancient imperial capital from Rome to the city of 'Byzantion' located on the easternmost territory of the European continent, at a major intersection of east-west trade. The emperor renamed this ancient port city Constantinople.

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