Blackfoot warrior, ca. 1887.

Blackfoot warrior, ca. 1887.

The Cree are one of the largest groups of First Nations / Native Americans in North America, with 200,000 members living in Canada. The major proportion of Cree in Canada live north and west of Lake Superior, in Ontario, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta and the Northwest Territories. About 15,000 live in eastern Quebec. The name "Cree" is derived from the Algonkian-language exonym Kiristino, which the Ojibwa used for tribes around Hudson Bay.

The Cree are one of the largest groups of First Nations / Native Americans in North America, with 200,000 members living in Canada. The major proportion of Cree in Canada live north and west of Lake Superior, in Ontario, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta and the Northwest Territories. About 15,000 live in eastern Quebec. The name "Cree" is derived from the Algonkian-language exonym Kiristino, which the Ojibwa used for tribes around Hudson Bay.

Stampede 100 Day Countdown – 1989: Treaty Seven tribes honoured #YYC

Stampede 100 Day Countdown – 1989: Treaty Seven tribes honoured #YYC

Porcupine quill cradle, First Nations; Mi'kmaq  c 1875 - cedar, birchbark, porcupine quill, spruce root and silk with copper tacks  15 cm x 16 cm x 3 cm. Shown at New Brunswick Museum.

Porcupine quill cradle, First Nations; Mi'kmaq c 1875 - cedar, birchbark, porcupine quill, spruce root and silk with copper tacks 15 cm x 16 cm x 3 cm. Shown at New Brunswick Museum.

A Piegan Home (The North American Indian, v. VI. Cambridge, MA: The University Press, 1911)

A Piegan Home (The North American Indian, v. VI. Cambridge, MA: The University Press, 1911)

Unknown: By Frank a. Rinehart who was a photographer in Omaha in Nebraska, in 1898 he received a command to photograph the Indian Congress.

Unknown: By Frank a. Rinehart who was a photographer in Omaha in Nebraska, in 1898 he received a command to photograph the Indian Congress.

A portrait of Chief Ninstints (Tom Price, left) and Chief Giatlins (John Robson, right). Tom Price (circa 1860-1927) was the last traditional chief of Ninstints (Skungwai) to live in the village and was also a talented carver of argillite. John Robson, a famous carver, was the successor to Chief Giatlins and stepfather of Charles Edenshaw.  Studio portrait by an unknown Victoria photographer circa 1884.

A portrait of Chief Ninstints (Tom Price, left) and Chief Giatlins (John Robson, right). Tom Price (circa 1860-1927) was the last traditional chief of Ninstints (Skungwai) to live in the village and was also a talented carver of argillite. John Robson, a famous carver, was the successor to Chief Giatlins and stepfather of Charles Edenshaw. Studio portrait by an unknown Victoria photographer circa 1884.

Progo Calete, Pueblo, 1898

Progo Calete, Pueblo, 1898

Blackfoot/Blackfeet girls, no date or names.

Blackfoot/Blackfeet girls, no date or names.

Matt-Sioux-J'ai mis ce photo du Sioux car dans le livre the train que tout la monde est sur est attaquer par les Sioux.(pg.51)

Matt-Sioux-J'ai mis ce photo du Sioux car dans le livre the train que tout la monde est sur est attaquer par les Sioux.(pg.51)

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