New Year Festivities in Iran

March 19th is the Persian New Year. The festivities have always been an opportunity to protest against a regime that opposes freedom and joy. Festivities start with a fire festival on the last Tuesday of the year (Charshanbe Suri), continues to the New Year (March 19th this year) and ends with picnics on the 13th day of the new year.
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Man jumping over a bonfire in Iran. This is an ancient Zoroastrian traditional festival. On the last Tuesday of the Persian New Year, people jump over  bonfires. Symbolically,   the fire would  take the pallor, sickness, and problems and in turn would give  warmth and energy.  The efforts by the Iranian regime to eliminate such festivities have resulted in more intense celebrations and a day of significant confrontation with the regime.

Man jumping over a bonfire in Iran. This is an ancient Zoroastrian traditional festival. On the last Tuesday of the Persian New Year, people jump over bonfires. Symbolically, the fire would take the pallor, sickness, and problems and in turn would give warmth and energy. The efforts by the Iranian regime to eliminate such festivities have resulted in more intense celebrations and a day of significant confrontation with the regime.

People jumping over bonfires in Iran. This is an ancient Zoroastrian traditional festival. On the last Tuesday of the Persian New Year, people jump over  bonfires. Symbolically,   the fire would  take the pallor, sickness, and problems and in turn would give  warmth and energy.  The efforts by the Iranian regime to eliminate such festivities have resulted in more intense celebrations and a day of significant confrontation with the regime.

People jumping over bonfires in Iran. This is an ancient Zoroastrian traditional festival. On the last Tuesday of the Persian New Year, people jump over bonfires. Symbolically, the fire would take the pallor, sickness, and problems and in turn would give warmth and energy. The efforts by the Iranian regime to eliminate such festivities have resulted in more intense celebrations and a day of significant confrontation with the regime.

Festivities on the last Tuesday of the Iranian New Year (Chashanbe Suri) have always been used by the Iranians as an opportunity to protest against a regime that opposes joy and freedom.

Festivities on the last Tuesday of the Iranian New Year (Chashanbe Suri) have always been used by the Iranians as an opportunity to protest against a regime that opposes joy and freedom.

Caroon by an Iranian artist, showing what Charshanbe Suri means to Iranian people.   On the last Tuesday of the Persian New Year, people jump over  bonfires. Symbolically,   the fire would  take the pallor, sickness, and problems and in turn would give  warmth and energy.  The efforts by the Iranian regime to eliminate such festivities have resulted in more intense celebrations and a day of significant confrontation with the regime.

Caroon by an Iranian artist, showing what Charshanbe Suri means to Iranian people. On the last Tuesday of the Persian New Year, people jump over bonfires. Symbolically, the fire would take the pallor, sickness, and problems and in turn would give warmth and energy. The efforts by the Iranian regime to eliminate such festivities have resulted in more intense celebrations and a day of significant confrontation with the regime.

Banner made by Iranians calling for protests against the Iranian regime.Festivities on the last Tuesday of the Iranian New Year (Chashanbe Suri) have always been used by the Iranians as an opportunity to protest against a regime that opposes joy and freedom.

Banner made by Iranians calling for protests against the Iranian regime.Festivities on the last Tuesday of the Iranian New Year (Chashanbe Suri) have always been used by the Iranians as an opportunity to protest against a regime that opposes joy and freedom.

Police monitoring the gatherings , trying to ban the Charshanbe Suri festivities. Festivities on the last Tuesday of the Iranian New Year (Chashanbe Suri) have always been used by the Iranians as an opportunity to protest against a regime that opposes joy and freedom.

Police monitoring the gatherings , trying to ban the Charshanbe Suri festivities. Festivities on the last Tuesday of the Iranian New Year (Chashanbe Suri) have always been used by the Iranians as an opportunity to protest against a regime that opposes joy and freedom.


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