'Ner Ner!'  From the Gorleston Psalter (MS 49622), f.123 r (c. 1310), @BLMedieval

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Elaine Treharne‏ @ETreharne Apr 13  How many bunnies in a book? Gorleston Psalter is chock-full (BL Add 49622, f35r, c. 1310) http://www.bl.uk/manuscripts/FullDisplay.aspx?ref=Add_MS_49622 … pic.twitter.com/QNEWFRycCg

Elaine Treharne‏ @ETreharne Apr 13 How many bunnies in a book? Gorleston Psalter is chock-full (BL Add 49622, f35r, c. 1310) http://www.bl.uk/manuscripts/FullDisplay.aspx?ref=Add_MS_49622 … pic.twitter.com/QNEWFRycCg

The Black Kiss . «Marginal scene of a grotesque hybrid examining another’s hindquarters» Gorleston Psalter, c. 1310-1324, Add MS 49622, f. 104r,  The British Library. https://ello.co/marginaliams/post/tmefst3ws20y9zgarxqs1q

The Black Kiss . «Marginal scene of a grotesque hybrid examining another’s hindquarters» Gorleston Psalter, c. 1310-1324, Add MS 49622, f. 104r, The British Library. https://ello.co/marginaliams/post/tmefst3ws20y9zgarxqs1q

A bearded layman makes a number of appearances throughout the manuscript, usually in attitudes of religious devotion (see, for example, f. 10r), and these images may represent the original patron.  One  candidate for this position is Roger Bigod, 5th Earl of Norfolk and Marshal of England (c. 1245 – 1306), but more recently it has been suggested that the honours may lie with John de Warenne, 7th Earl of Surrey (1286 – 1347), whose arms can be seen throughout the manuscript.

A bearded layman makes a number of appearances throughout the manuscript, usually in attitudes of religious devotion (see, for example, f. 10r), and these images may represent the original patron. One candidate for this position is Roger Bigod, 5th Earl of Norfolk and Marshal of England (c. 1245 – 1306), but more recently it has been suggested that the honours may lie with John de Warenne, 7th Earl of Surrey (1286 – 1347), whose arms can be seen throughout the manuscript.

f. 107v:  Historiated initial 'E' of the resurrected Christ with musicians below, and marginal images of musicians and a knight holding arms . Soon after the manuscript's creation it came into the possession of Norwich Cathedral Priory, where an extra miniature, prayers and a litany were added c. 1320-1325 (ff. 7r-7v & ff. 226r-228r).  The original manuscript seems to have been written c. 1310 by a single scribe, who worked in close collaboration with a group of illuminators.

f. 107v: Historiated initial 'E' of the resurrected Christ with musicians below, and marginal images of musicians and a knight holding arms . Soon after the manuscript's creation it came into the possession of Norwich Cathedral Priory, where an extra miniature, prayers and a litany were added c. 1320-1325 (ff. 7r-7v & ff. 226r-228r). The original manuscript seems to have been written c. 1310 by a single scribe, who worked in close collaboration with a group of illuminators.

From the Gorleston Psalter (MS 49622), f.123 r (c. 1310)

From the Gorleston Psalter (MS 49622), f.123 r (c. 1310)

1310-1324, Psalter, with preceeding calendar and prayers, followed by Canticles, Litanies, Collects, Offices and prayers.Contents: ff. 1r-6v: Calendar.f. 7r: miniature of the Crucifixion (added after the manuscript passed to Norwich Cathedral Priory, c. 1320-1325).f. 7v: prayer before the Psalter, ‘Suscipere dignare domine dues omnipotens hos psalmos quos ego indignus peccator’ (added after the manuscript passed to Norwich Cathedral Priory, c. 1320-1325).ff. 8r-190v: Psalter, with ten-fold…

1310-1324, Psalter, with preceeding calendar and prayers, followed by Canticles, Litanies, Collects, Offices and prayers.Contents: ff. 1r-6v: Calendar.f. 7r: miniature of the Crucifixion (added after the manuscript passed to Norwich Cathedral Priory, c. 1320-1325).f. 7v: prayer before the Psalter, ‘Suscipere dignare domine dues omnipotens hos psalmos quos ego indignus peccator’ (added after the manuscript passed to Norwich Cathedral Priory, c. 1320-1325).ff. 8r-190v: Psalter, with ten-fold…

Additional evidence for this theory could come from the overwhelming number of rabbits that feature in the Gorleston Psalter, seen occasionally in their warrens – a possible visual pun on the Earl's family name (see below, and the bas-de-page of the Beatus page, at the top).

Additional evidence for this theory could come from the overwhelming number of rabbits that feature in the Gorleston Psalter, seen occasionally in their warrens – a possible visual pun on the Earl's family name (see below, and the bas-de-page of the Beatus page, at the top).

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