Grand culverin of Francis I, with royal salamander emblem and with the Latin motto Nutrisco et extinguo .- Pour François I°, la conquête du Milanais, c'est l'occasion de venger les défaites de la précédente guerre italienne; 2 ans avant son avènement, tous les territoires occupés par ses prédécesseurs en Italie avaient été perdus. La conquête du Milanais s'inscrit totalement dans la continuité des guerres d'Italie commencées 20 ans plus tôt par le roi Charles VIII.

Grand culverin of Francis I, with royal salamander emblem and with the Latin motto Nutrisco et extinguo .- Pour François I°, la conquête du Milanais, c'est l'occasion de venger les défaites de la précédente guerre italienne; 2 ans avant son avènement, tous les territoires occupés par ses prédécesseurs en Italie avaient été perdus. La conquête du Milanais s'inscrit totalement dans la continuité des guerres d'Italie commencées 20 ans plus tôt par le roi Charles VIII.

pierre+chastain | Publication of Commentaries on the Epistles of St. Paul, by Jacques ... my 7th great grandfather . Immigrated from France in 1700 to avoid religious prosecution. Settled in Va.

pierre+chastain | Publication of Commentaries on the Epistles of St. Paul, by Jacques ... my 7th great grandfather . Immigrated from France in 1700 to avoid religious prosecution. Settled in Va.

air witch

air witch

Les armes de François Ier, roi de France avec plusieurs de ses emblèmes, la…

Les armes de François Ier, roi de France avec plusieurs de ses emblèmes, la…

Elizabethan coins - Sixpence 1593 (5th Issue)

Elizabethan coins - Sixpence 1593 (5th Issue)

The Field of the Cloth of Gold or Camp du Drap d'Or is the name given to a place in Balinghem, between Guînes and Ardres, in France, near Calais, that was the site of a meeting that took place from 7 June to 24 June 1520, between King Henry VIII of England and King Francis I of France.

The Field of the Cloth of Gold or Camp du Drap d'Or is the name given to a place in Balinghem, between Guînes and Ardres, in France, near Calais, that was the site of a meeting that took place from 7 June to 24 June 1520, between King Henry VIII of England and King Francis I of France.

Giambattista della Porta  (1535?[2] – 4 February 1615), also known as Giovanni Battista Della Porta and John Baptist Porta,[3] was an Italian scholar, polymath and playwright who lived in Naples at the time of the Scientific Revolution and Reformation.  His most famous work, first published in 1558, was entitled Magiae Naturalis (Natural Magic). He was also referred to as "professor of secrets" - Thomas Harriot read his book and it gave him the idea to invent the refracting telescope.

Giambattista della Porta (1535?[2] – 4 February 1615), also known as Giovanni Battista Della Porta and John Baptist Porta,[3] was an Italian scholar, polymath and playwright who lived in Naples at the time of the Scientific Revolution and Reformation. His most famous work, first published in 1558, was entitled Magiae Naturalis (Natural Magic). He was also referred to as "professor of secrets" - Thomas Harriot read his book and it gave him the idea to invent the refracting telescope.

François Ier. 21 février 1526 : François Ier est rendu à la liberté par Charles-Quint. Histoire de France. Patrimoine. Magazine

François Ier. 21 février 1526 : François Ier est rendu à la liberté par Charles-Quint. Histoire de France. Patrimoine. Magazine

Charles III of Savoy (October 10, 1486 – 17 August 1553), often called Charles the Good, was Duke of Savoy from 1504 to 1553, although most of his lands were ruled by the French between 1536 and his death.

Charles III of Savoy (October 10, 1486 – 17 August 1553), often called Charles the Good, was Duke of Savoy from 1504 to 1553, although most of his lands were ruled by the French between 1536 and his death.

Detail of a panoramic view of London by Wenceslaus Hollar, published in 1647

Detail of a panoramic view of London by Wenceslaus Hollar, published in 1647

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